Friday September 29, 2017

Tonight on The Hagmann Report…

7:00pm EDT join veteran investigators, father/son team, Douglas J Hagmann and Joe Hagmann for analysis of the news cycle, including the recently reported head-to-head of a brilliant mind (in Sean Hannity) and a fake stream media buffoon in he form of Rachel Maddow.

8:00pm EDT  Welcome return guest, James Perloff,
Stick around in hours two and three, starting at 8:00pm EST, we welcome back Pearl Harbor historian, prolific authorand Deep State investigator, Mr James Perloff.  James Perloff was introduced to Team Hagmann by Sean from Sgt Report and we extend warm gratitude to both gentlemen for their time and insights.

James tells his bio (in his own words).

James as child

I suffered from undiagnosed low-spectrum autism in my youth, brought on by allergic reactions to DPT shots and boosters. I describe my struggles with this condition in Appendix V of Truth Is a Lonely Warrior.

Like others who have turned deficits to advantage, the reclusiveness associated with my autism made me contemplative, and I was able to hone an inborn skill for writing. However, my immaturity, poor self-discipline and messed-up worldview would make it many years before this skill would bear fruit in the form of books worth anyone’s reading.

My condition was not helped by my family’s complete lack of any spiritual dimension or connection to God. My father was ethnically Jewish, a fact he concealed so well that I didn’t even know it until I was in my twenties. My mother was from French-Dutch-German extraction; her father was a Freemason and she had grown up nominally Christian. Our own family, however, was not even nominally Christian. (This is not to suggest that we were somehow malevolent by default; we were more a less a typical American middle-class family of the day.)

I entered Colby College (Maine) as an English major in 1969. This was an electric time in America, as the anti-war movement over Vietnam was peaking. I lived for a time in Harvard Square in Cambridge, Mass., which was then New England’s “Hippie Central.” My first interest in politics was sparked at about that time. I soaked up the hippie outlook, and ridiculed all things patriotic or Christian. I did not serve in the military as the draft had temporarily transitioned to a lottery system, and my birthday drew number 318. Since I would have made a bad soldier, this was as good for the military as it was for me.

I did not complete my English degree because I did not think it would confer real-world earning capacity on me. I met the brother of the professor who served as my dorm head; he was doing well as a registered nurse and told me that (in an interesting reversal of Affirmative Action) there was a high demand for men in nursing. I had seen nurses at work, and believed this was a good career opportunity in a declining job market.

I transferred to the Boston University School of Nursing, receiving my BSN and licensure as an RN in 1975. That nursing school is now defunct, but was then a bustling place with about 600 students. I would spend decades as a nurse. While nursing might seem incongruous with pursuing writing, for me it provided a healthy balance. Writing is rather nerdy, isolated work that confines you to a computer screen (or back then, a typewriter). Doing it constantly isn’t healthy. Nursing is on-your feet, physical, and involves a ton of personal interaction. Nursing also taught me how to keep work organized, which is essential to surviving the profession, but useful in any endeavor.

In the 1970s, however, I still suffered from the low-spectrum autism that made work, relationships, and life itself a much harder struggle than it should have been. In an effort to pull myself out of this, I became involved with a New Age cult for about ten years.

In 1978, I noticed a girl reading a copy of Gary Allen’s None Dare Call It Conspiracy. Without speaking to the girl or looking inside the book, I felt a compelling need to buy a copy. The book changed my life. For the first time, history began making sense: it had a pattern to it, and was not the haphazard amalgamation of events I had been taught in school. None Daredemonstrated that most geopolitical activity was being directed by a wealthy oligarchy who had an ultimate goal of world government.

I did not complete my English degree because I did not think it would confer real-world earning capacity on me. I met the brother of the professor who served as my dorm head; he was doing well as a registered nurse and told me that (in an interesting reversal of Affirmative Action) there was a high demand for men in nursing. I had seen nurses at work, and believed this was a good career opportunity in a declining job market.

I transferred to the Boston University School of Nursing, receiving my BSN and licensure as an RN in 1975. That nursing school is now defunct, but was then a bustling place with about 600 students. I would spend decades as a nurse. While nursing might seem incongruous with pursuing writing, for me it provided a healthy balance. Writing is rather nerdy, isolated work that confines you to a computer screen (or back then, a typewriter). Doing it constantly isn’t healthy. Nursing is on-your feet, physical, and involves a ton of personal interaction. Nursing also taught me how to keep work organized, which is essential to surviving the profession, but useful in any endeavor.

In the 1970s, however, I still suffered from the low-spectrum autism that made work, relationships, and life itself a much harder struggle than it should have been. In an effort to pull myself out of this, I became involved with a New Age cult for about ten years.

In 1978, I noticed a girl reading a copy of Gary Allen’s None Dare Call It Conspiracy. Without speaking to the girl or looking inside the book, I felt a compelling need to buy a copy. The book changed my life. For the first time, history began making sense: it had a pattern to it, and was not the haphazard amalgamation of events I had been taught in school. None Daredemonstrated that most geopolitical activity was being directed by a wealthy oligarchy who had an ultimate goal of world government.

Fourth: gun nut. Belongs to a militia group. Thinks owning a tripod-mounted, belt-fed machine gun is a God-given right, specifically guaranteed by the Constitution. His personal motto: “They can have my AR15, my bazooka and my heat-seeking missile launcher when they pry them loose from my cold, dead fingers.” Is determined that when the government comes to “git” him for the FEMA concentration camp, they’ll never take him alive. Thinks he’s going to go out in a blaze of glory like James Cagney at the end of White Heat, shouting, “Come and get me, coppers”.

 

Jon Robberson is the Producer for the Hagmann Report.  Follow him on Twitter

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